Directory results

 
1 to 10 of 103 articles
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Legal framework - Sources and structure of health and safety law - Levels of duty - 16
    “Absolute duty”, or “strict liability”, is the highest level of duty. This is imposed where the level of risk is so high that injury is inevitable if preventative action is not taken. No risk assessment is required when deciding what control measures to take; the employer must do whatever is necessary to address the risk, regardless of the cost. Terms such as "must" and "shall" are used in the legislation to describe what people need to do in order to fulfil the requirement. For example, there is an...
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Legal framework - Individual duties and obligations - Employers - 210
    The law places duties on companies and the individuals who run them. Board members and directors have individual and collective responsibilities for health and safety and can be held personally liable if duties are not met (¶230+). In the event of an incident, civil claims can be brought against companies and individuals (¶9700+). An employer can be a company, partnership, sole trader or any other body or organisation that employs workers.
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Legal framework - Individual duties and obligations - Non-employees - 290
    A non-employee could be a customer, visitor, client or member of the public who is visiting a workplace or may simply be a person in the proximity of work activities being carried out. They should be provided with information on any risks present. Where people visit a workplace, the relevant information could be provided by way of a visitor's induction, or it may be sufficient to put up signs to warn people of the identified risks. It is left to the employer's judgement as to what health and safety information...
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Legal framework - Safety culture - 350
    The overarching attitude towards health and safety that is practised and promoted within a company is known as the safety culture. The way in which this is received, adhered to and practised among employees very much depends on the example set by management. An effective safety culture is fostered by those at the top of a business taking ownership of health and safety and actively promoting it in a positive light. Effective and engaged management produces appropriate policies and processes, which lead to all...
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Documentation - 500
    There are statutory documents that need to be in place for the effective management of health and safety in the workplace. Some are only required when employee numbers meet a certain threshold; others are needed if workers are exposed to particular risks. Employers must be aware of their obligations to ensure that the right information is recorded and communicated to those who need it. Best practice would be for an employer to develop an integrated safety management system consisting of all statutory documents...
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Documentation - Risk assessments - 600
    Part of the planning aspect of an employer's health and safety system is identifying and anticipating the types of hazards that exist within the company. This covers both routine and non-routine operations, and must take all reasonably foreseeable hazards into account. Employers are required to carry out risk assessments that identify the risks that may be faced by its employees or others affected by its work. This allows the employer to identify appropriate measures to eliminate the risk or, where this is...
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Documentation - Safe system of work - 700
    A safe system of work is a document that formalises how a particular task should be carried out to ensure that it is done safely. They are also known as method statements or plans of work. The document describes, step by step, how a particular work activity is to be completed safely. The level of detail should relate to the risks presented by the work, so more risky activities need a more detailed procedure. Systems of work are particularly useful for high-risk, complex or infrequent tasks, and those likely...
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Documentation - Permits to work - 750
    Permits to work are appropriate for potentially dangerous or unusual work. They ensure that the system of work is properly implemented in a formal manner. Permits are required where the work may present a risk of serious injury that cannot be adequately reduced using control measures. The permit should detail the work to be carried out as well as the precautions that should be taken. They provide a record that all foreseeable hazards have been considered.
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Documentation - Other documentation - Health and safety law poster - 810
    If a company has any employees, it must display a health and safety law poster. This should be in a place that can easily be seen by workers. If the company employs people who are not based at a central office, or travel to different work locations, for example a plumbing company where the employees work at client sites, it can provide the poster as a pocket card or leaflet to staff. The poster sets out what an employer must do, what is required of employees, the steps to take if there are health and safety...
    Click here
  • Health & Safety Memo - General requirements - Accidents, ill health and first aid - 901
    Accidents can result in a number of direct and indirect costs for employers, only some of which are covered by insurance. The table below shows the typical examples of costs to businesses when an accident happens: Type of cost Insured Uninsured Direct Compensation claims Damage to equipment Fines Sick pay Indirect Business loss Process liability Loss of good will Overtime Damage to reputation Investigation and potential prosecution Indirect costs are generally 8-36 times greater than direct costs
    Click here
 
1 to 10 of 103 articles